LIVING SMALL – Film Screening and Fundraiser

Title: LIVING SMALL – Film Screening and Fundraiser
Location: The Bookshelf, Downtown Guelph
Link out: Click here
Description: Support our Mobile Learning Lab Fundraiser

Yorklands Green Hub presents a night exploring the Tiny House movement. See the documentary “Living Small” and hear presentations on some of the exciting developments happening here in Guelph.
For more information contact: [email protected]

Tickets are available through Miijidaa Cafe + Bistro or online at Eventbrite:

For more information visit: www.yorklandsgreenhub.ca
Start Time:  7:00 pm
Date: 2016-05-30
End Time: 10:00 pm

Guelph Brain Tumour Walk

Title: Guelph Brain Tumour Walk
Location: College Ave East Guelph, Ontario,
Link out: Click here
Description: Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada will be holding their 10th annual walk in Guelph at University of Guelph Arboretum, on May 29, 2016. Registration starts at 8:30 am, opening ceremonies at 9:30 am, and the walk will start shortly afterwards. The event will end at 1:00 pm.
Start Time: 08:30 am
Date: 2016-05-29
End Time: 1:00 pm

“Walk for Water” in support of our “Water For Life, Not Profit” campaign

Title: “Walk for Water” in support of our “Water For Life, Not Profit” campaign
Location: Guelph City Hall
Link out: Click here
Description: Will begin with a Traditional Territorial Acknowledgement and some water songs.

Then we will head south on Gordon all the way through Guelph and finish at the National Headquarters for Nestle Waters Canada, near Aberfoyle, around 5:30 pm.

We have done this walk before and it talks about 3 hrs. Please invite others to join for some of it or all of it! There are other important events happening that same day (The Niska Road Cleanup for example). It would be great to have a really big showing at the beginning of this walk at City Hall and at the end at Nestle’s.

We want this to be a celebration of our water. We want this to be fun! We encourage bucket drummers, festive finery, noisemakers and beautiful signage. This is a peaceful walk and ask that all participants keep this tone in mind. This walk will help us in one of our other goals which is to “paint Wellington County Blue”. We are asking people everywhere to show support for the idea of Water for Life, Not Profit by tying a blue ribbon on a tree on your front yard and by wearing our blue ribbon lapel pins. Ideally we will be tying these ribbons along our walking route! These ribbons are available from 10 Carden and other venues around our County beginning soon.
Start Time:  2:00 pm
Date: 2016-05-29
End Time:  6:00 pm

Speed River Project Community Tree Planting Day at Hadati Creek

Title: Speed River Project Community Tree Planting Day at Hadati Creek
Location: Hadati Creek at Grange Road
Link out: Click here
Description: OPIRG Guelph’s Speed River Project has teamed up with the City of Guelph River System Advisory Committee to run this Spring’s Community Tree Plantings. We will be planting native trees, shrubs and herbaceous species along Guelph riverside lands. We will continue our dialogue about our river systems, and various ways to improve the quality of water for ourselves, downstream communities, and the environment.

Special thanks go to the Great Lake Community Guardian Fund (Ministry of Environment and Climate Change) which is our major sponsor for these events.

Some of the benefits of tree planting are:

– Restoration of the riparian buffer zone slows down surface runoff, reduces land erosion, and traps pollutants. Reduced runoff of pollutants reduces algal bloom in the river stream. – Trees and shrubs increase water storage capacity within the local sub-watershed.
– Tree canopies along the riverbank reduce water temperature and increase dissolved oxygen in the water. Increased oxygen in water increases aquatic biodiversity.
– Reduced runoff of pollutants reduces algal bloom in the river stream.
– Planting trees and shrubs increases plant biodiversity in the riparian buffer zone, and provides better habitat for wildlife.

This is a fun, family friendly event! Refreshments will be served!

For more information check out www.opirgguelph.org.

To register call Kiran at 519.824.2091 or email her at
[email protected]
Start Time: 9:00 am
Date: 2016-05-28
End Time: 1:00 pm

Position Statement: Basic Income Guarantee

Title: Position Statement: Basic Income Guarantee
Location: GUELPH & WELLINGTON TASK FORCE FOR POVERTY ELIMINATION
Link out: Click here
Description:

It is the position of the Guelph & Wellington Task Force for Poverty Elimination that poverty is an
urgent human rights and social justice issue for local, provincial, and federal governments. A Basic
Income Guarantee (BIG) is required as part of a coherent strategy to effectively eliminate poverty.

Introduction:
The Guelph & Wellington Task Force for Poverty Elimination believes that the perpetuation of poverty is both avoidable and untenable, particularly in a country as wealthy as Canada. The social and economic consequences of Canada’s persistent failure to eradicate poverty is well documented. The waste of human potential, as well as the costs to both current and future generations, calls on all of us to make poverty an urgent human rights and social justice priority for local, provincial and federal governments. It is the position of the Poverty Task Force that a Basic Income Guarantee (BIG) is required as a foundational piece of any coherent strategy to effectively eliminate poverty.

What is a Basic Income Guarantee?
A Basic Income Guarantee (BIG), also known as a Guaranteed Annual Income, is an unconditional cash transfer from government to individuals or families to provide a minimum annual income (Lammam, 2015). The Basic Income Canada Network asserts that a BIG “ensures everyone an income sufficient to meet basic needs and live
with dignity, regardless of work status” (2015).

Why is a Basic Income Guarantee necessary?
A Basic Income Guarantee (BIG) has the potential to eliminate poverty in Canada. Based on the Low-Income Measure After-Tax (LIM-AT), 4.6 million people in Canada, or 13.8% of the population, lived in poverty in 2013 (Statistics Canada, 2015). Rates were slightly higher in Ontario, where 14.6% of Ontarians lived in low income (Statistics Canada, 2015). While there are social insurance and assistance programs aimed to support those in financial need, some fail to lift recipients out of poverty. For example, while Ontario Works (OW) is intended to help people who are in temporary financial need, its benefit rates are often too low for families and individuals to make ends meet. For example, a single person on OW receives a maximum of $681 per month (includes basic needs allowance and maximum shelter allowance), or $8,172 annually. This falls nearly 60% below the LIM-AT threshold of $19,460 per year.
While the provincial government has made incremental increases to social assistance benefit rates in the past few years, there are examples of other benefits that have had a more direct and immediate impact on those living in poverty. The Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) provides a monthly non-taxable benefit to Old Age Security
(OAS) pension recipients who have low income and are living in Canada (Government of Canada, 2015). The introduction of this benefit, along with the Old Age Security (OAS) program and the Canada Pension Plan (CPP), has led to Canada having one of the lowest rates of elder poverty in world (Emery, 2013).
Aside from social insurance and benefit programs, many Canadians struggle while living in poverty despite being employed. At $11.25 per hour, an individual making minimum wage in Ontario working full-time throughout the year (35 hours per week, 50 weeks per year) will bring home $19,688 annually (before-tax). This falls below the
Low-Income Measure Before-Tax (LIM-BT) threshold of $22,160. While the province of Ontario continues to make commitments to increase the minimum wage in a bid to lift people out of poverty (the rate will jump to $11.40 per hour as of October 1, 2016), it continues to fall well below the living wage of $16.50 per hour for GuelphWellington (Ellery, 2015).
In addition to low wages, the rise of precarious employment has resulted in real implications for economic wellbeing.
Recent research suggests that 20% of those working in Canada are in precarious forms of employment, while another 20% are in employment that shares at least some of the characteristics of precarious employment.
This includes full-time employees who receive a wage, but no benefits, workers who may work variable hours, and workers who believe they are unlikely to be employed by the same firm a year from now (Lewchuk, 2013).
Inadequate social assistance benefits, low minimum wage rates, and precarious employment are just some of the factors that are contributing to the spread of poverty, which is having negative effects on the overall health and wellbeing of Canadians. Research continues to demonstrate that income is perhaps the most important social
determinant of health, noting that level of income “shapes overall living conditions, affects psychological functioning, and influences health-related behaviours” (Mikkonen, 2010).
The cost of poverty in Canada is also a point of consideration. It is estimated that the financial cost of poverty in Canada is between $72.5 billion and $86.1 billion per year (Citizens for Public Justice). This includes the cost of poverty on the Canadian healthcare system, social assistance spending, the Canada Social Transfer, the criminal justice system, and other factors (Canada Without Poverty, n.d.).

It is the position of the PTF that the introduction of a BIG is an integral part of any effective approach to eliminating poverty in Canada.
Date: 2016-05-17

CAMPUS IN COMMUNITY Research in Action: Immigration Series

Title: CAMPUS IN COMMUNITY Research in Action: Immigration Series
Location: Guelph Civic Museum, 52 Norfolk St.
Link out: Click here
Description: This is the second lecture in the series

How can we best support the complex needs of immigrant families and enhance family safety?

Join Drs. Baobaid and Ashbourne at this free public lecture as they present their research and
practice working to address risk factors for family violence with refugee families who are
migrating from conflict zones and have complex trauma histories.

More information is available at: http://www.cesinstitute.ca/events
Start Time:  7:00 pm
Date: 2016-05-18

Speed River Project Community Tree Planting Day at Howitt Park

Title: Speed River Project Community Tree Planting Day at Howitt Park
Location: Howitt Park (Beechwood Ave, Guelph)
Link out: Click here
Description: OPIRG Guelph’s Speed River Project has teamed up with the City of Guelph River System Advisory Committee to run this Spring’s Community Tree Plantings. We will be planting native trees, shrubs and herbaceous species along Guelph riverside lands. We will continue our dialogue about our river systems, and various ways to improve the quality of water for ourselves, downstream communities, and the environment.

Special thanks go to the Great Lake Community Guardian Fund (Ministry of Environment and Climate Change) which is our major sponsor for these events.

Some of the benefits of tree planting are:

– Restoration of the riparian buffer zone slows down surface runoff, reduces land erosion, and traps pollutants. Reduced runoff of pollutants reduces algal bloom in the river stream
– Trees and shrubs increase water storage capacity within the local sub-watershed.
– Tree canopies along the riverbank reduce water temperature and increase dissolved oxygen in the water. Increased oxygen in water increases aquatic biodiversity.
– Reduced runoff of pollutants reduces algal bloom in the river stream.
– Planting trees and shrubs increases plant biodiversity in the riparian buffer zone, and provides better habitat for wildlife.

This is a fun, family friendly event! Refreshments will be served!

For more information check out www.opirgguelph.org.

To register call Kiran at 519.824.2091 or email her at [email protected]
Start Time: 9:00 am
Date: 2016-05-14
End Time: 1:00 pm

Regular Monthly Meeting of the Guelph Wellington Coalition for Social Justice

Title: Regular Monthly Meeting of the Guelph Wellington Coalition for Social Justice
Location: OECTA Office, Orchard Park, Ignatius Centre
Link out: Click here

Description:

PLEASE NOTE NEW DAY THIS MONTH ONLY

Regular monthly meeting of the Guelph Wellington Coalition for Social Justice. Generally held the second Tuesday of the month except during July and August.

For information or to join, call GWCSJ Chairperson, George Kelly at 519-824-1885

Start Time:  7:00 pm
Date: 2016-05-17
End Time:  9:00 pm

THE BOOKSHELF FOCUSES ON FIRST NATIONS, METIS, INUIT WRITERS AND AUTHOR ALLIES

Title: THE BOOKSHELF FOCUSES ON FIRST NATIONS, METIS, INUIT WRITERS AND AUTHOR ALLIES
Location: The Bookshelf Cinema and Bookstore
Link out: Click here
Description: On Saturday April 30th, across North America, authors will be present in independent bookstores to show their appreciation for all that bookstores do to foster book and community culture.
The Bookshelf has invited Tom King, Rene Meshake and other First Nations, Metis and Inuit writers, storytellers, drummers and singers to take part in this day. Author ally John Ralston Saul will also be present. The opening gathering will be at 10:30. There will be children’s readings, young indigenous writers, and many speaking about residential school experiences. John Ralston Saul and Tom King will be speaking in the cinema at 1:30. We are honoured to have this important gathering. The time is now to work together to understand and change this most urgent historical wrongdoing!

For dettails contact: [email protected]

With special thanks to the Bookshelf who were a sponsor for the Guelph chapter Council of Canadians Trans Pacific Partnership Town Hall held on Wednesday April 27th
Start Time: 10:30 am
Date: 2016-04-30